Mining the Depths

I'll read almost anything and love what captures my imagination. Best of all is responding to books in the larger cultural sense, loving or loathsome. Literature should have a place in the wider world.

 

And I'm another GoodReads refugee. 

The Lies of Locke Lamora (The Gentleman Bastard Sequence)

The Lies of Locke Lamora  - Scott Lynch Doesn't it have a lovely cover?Unfortunately, it's entirely inappropriate for the tone and style of the novel. I should have paid more attention to another edition's comparision to Ocean's Eleven, which is not my genre, and the comparison to Robin Hood at all is pushing it.They should have stuck with this one:Problem was, I hated Locke. Didn't find him the least bit charming, and yet I don't think I was supposed to see him as a sociopath, though I'm fairly sure he was. Surely Locke's genius should have provided some consolation? Only it felt like an informed attribute: everyone's always just so impressed by Locke, and we spend so much time going on about his various gambits ('cause he's a genius), I just got bored. You might ask: if you see so much of his planning, how can his intelligence be an informed attribute? Because I don't remember any scenes of Locke working to figure it out. Have you ever watched Sherlock? Even the consulting detective himself has to stop and put all the clues together, but as I recall, most of Locke's brilliance was recounted after the fact.That could be unfair. Still, what with Locke-as-protagonist, and this terrible, terrible world, the novel felt too self satisfied. It reveled in all the ugliness and gore.But I didn't care about anyone! All the side characters were one-dimensional, especially the significant ones—which is just as well, considering they amounted to nothing more than motivation fodder for Locke. Yes, there was a lot of graphic violence, but it didn't serve the story. Now, I'm not opposed to violence or gore in books, but it was so over the top, I occasionally snorted in amusement before I could stop myself (which makes me feel like a terrible person).I suppose I liked Doña Vorchenza and Sophia(?). Unfortunately, I can't remember much about them.There's my real trouble right there. Because I didn't like Locke, I kept putting the book down; every time I put the book down, I forgot what was going on, who was who, and why I should care. Also, related to that, the pacing felt choppy. I read this on my nook, and the segments were all really short, and—this can't be faulted to the author—after every section break, the first paragraph was formatted in a larger font. It very much seemed to drag anything out.I can see why others like this book: if you don't despise Locke, you won't be as distracted from the plot like I was, and there is a lot of it. I honestly can't think of how to put the positives, but if this is your thing, please go and read it.But if, like me, you saw the cover, but not Ocean's Eleven, just know what you're getting into, and be prepared for a long, digressing set-up and conventional plot.

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